20 Foods That Are High in Vitamin E

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Vitamin E is a organisation of absolute antioxidants that strengthen your cells from oxidative stress. Adequate vitamin E levels are essential for a physique to duty normally.

If we don’t get enough, we might turn some-more disposed to infections, knowledge marred eyesight or humour from flesh weakness.

Fortunately, vitamin E is widespread in foods. As a result, we are doubtful to turn deficient unless your nutritious fullness is impaired.

Nevertheless, everybody should try to eat copiousness of whole dishes abounding in vitamin E.

In a United States, 15 mg of vitamin E per day is deliberate adequate for a immeasurable infancy of adults. This daily value (DV) is comparison as a anxiety on nourishment labels in a US and Canada.

Below is a list of 20 dishes that are high in alpha-tocopherol, that is a many active form of vitamin E (1).

This essay also provides 5 lists of vitamin-E-rich foods, categorized by food group.

20 Foods High in Vitamin E

Vitamin E is a common nutritious found in many foods. A few foods, including cooking oils, seeds and nuts, are unusually abounding sources.

1. Wheat Germ Oil — 135% DV per serving

1 tablespoon: 20 mg (135% DV)
100 grams: 149 mg (996% DV)

2. Sunflower Seeds — 66% DV per serving

1 ounce: 10 mg (66% DV)
100 grams: 35 mg (234% DV)

3. Almonds — 48% DV per serving

1 ounce: 7.3 mg (48% DV)
100 grams: 26 mg (171% DV)

4. Hazelnut Oil — 43% DV per serving

1 tablespoon: 6.4 mg (43% DV)
100 grams: 47 mg (315% DV)

5. Mamey Sapote — 39% DV per serving

Half a fruit: 5.9 mg (39% DV)
100 grams: 2.1 mg (14% DV)

6. Sunflower Oil — 37% DV per serving

1 tablespoon: 5.6 mg (37% DV)
100 grams: 41 mg (274% DV)

7. Almond Oil — 36% DV per serving

1 tablespoon: 5.3 mg (36% DV)
100 grams: 39 mg (261% DV)

8. Hazelnuts — 28% DV per serving

1 ounce: 4.3 mg (28% DV)
100 grams: 15 mg (100% DV)

9. Abalone — 23% DV per serving

3 ounces: 3.4 mg (23% DV)
100 grams: 4.0 mg (27% DV)

10. Pine Nuts — 18% DV per serving

1 ounce: 2.7 mg (18% DV)
100 grams: 9.3 mg (62% DV)

11. Goose Meat — 16% DV per serving

1 cup: 2.4 mg (16% DV)
100 grams: 1.7 mg (12% DV)

12. Peanuts — 16% DV per serving

1 ounce: 2.4 mg (16% DV)
100 grams: 8.3 mg (56% DV)

13. Atlantic Salmon — 14% DV per serving

Half a fillet: 2.0 mg (14% DV)
100 grams: 1.1 mg (8% DV)

14. Avocado — 14% DV per serving

Half a fruit: 2.1 mg (14% DV)
100 grams: 2.1 mg (14% DV)

15. Rainbow Trout — 13% DV per serving

1 fillet: 2.0 mg (13% DV)
100 grams: 2.8 mg (19% DV)

16. Red Sweet Pepper (raw) — 13% DV per serving

1 middle pepper: 1.9 mg (13% DV)
100 grams: 1.6 mg (11% DV)

17. Brazil Nuts — 11% DV per serving

1 ounce: 1.6 mg (11% DV)
100 grams: 5.7 mg (38% DV)

18. Mango — 10% DV per serving

Half a fruit: 1.5 mg (10% DV)
100 grams: 0.9 mg (6% DV)

19. Turnip Greens (raw) — 10% DV per serving

1 cup: 1.6 mg (10% DV)
100 grams: 2.9 mg (19% DV)

20. Kiwifruit — 7% DV per serving

1 middle fruit: 1.0 mg (7% DV)
100 grams: 1.5 mg (10% DV)

10 Animal Products High in Vitamin E

Many animal-based dishes are also good sources of vitamin E.

1. Abalone — 23% DV per serving

3 ounces: 3.4 mg (23% DV)
100 grams: 4.0 mg (27% DV)

2. Goose Meat — 16% DV per serving

1 cup: 2.4 mg (16% DV)
100 grams: 1.7 mg (12% DV)

3. Atlantic Salmon — 14% DV per serving

Half a fillet: 2.0 mg (14% DV)
100 grams: 1.1 mg (8% DV)

4. Rainbow Trout — 13% DV per serving

1 fillet: 2.0 mg (13% DV)
100 grams: 2.8 mg (19% DV)

5. Snails — 9% DV per serving

1 ounce: 1.4 mg (9% DV)
100 grams: 5.0 mg (33% DV)

6. Crayfish — 8% DV per serving

3 ounces: 1.3 mg (8% DV)
100 grams: 1.5 mg (10% DV)

7. Fish Roe — 7% DV per serving

1 tablespoon: 1.0 mg (7% DV)
100 grams: 7.0 mg (47% DV)

8. Octopus — 7% DV per serving

3 ounces: 1.0 mg (7% DV)
100 grams: 1.2 mg (8% DV)

9. Lobster — 6% DV per serving

3 ounces: 0.9 mg (6% DV)
100 grams: 1.0 mg (7% DV)

10. Cod (dried) — 5% DV per serving

1 ounce: 0.8 mg (5% DV)
100 grams: 2.8 mg (19% DV)

10 Seeds and Nuts High in Vitamin E

Seeds and nuts are among a best sources of vitamin E.

Below are some of a richest sources of alpha-tocopherol. Many of these seeds and nuts are also high in other forms of vitamin E, such as gamma-tocopherol.

1. Sunflower Seeds — 66% DV per serving

1 ounce: 10 mg (66% DV)
100 grams: 35 mg (234% DV)

2. Almonds — 48% DV per serving

1 ounce: 7.3 mg (48% DV)
100 grams: 26 mg (171% DV)

3. Hazelnuts — 28% DV per serving

1 ounce: 4.3 mg (28% DV)
100 grams: 15 mg (100% DV)

4. Pine Nuts — 18% DV per serving

1 ounce: 2.7 mg (18% DV)
100 grams: 9.3 mg (62% DV)

5. Peanuts — 16% DV per serving

1 ounce: 2.4 mg (16% DV)
100 grams: 8.3 mg (56% DV)

6. Brazil Nuts — 11% DV per serving

1 ounce: 1.6 mg (11% DV)
100 grams: 5.7 mg (38% DV)

7. Pistachios — 5% DV per serving

1 ounce: 0.8 mg (5% DV)
100 grams: 2.9 mg (19% DV)

8. Pumpkin Seeds — 4% DV per serving

1 ounce: 0.6 mg (4% DV)
100 grams: 2.2 mg (15% DV)

9. Pecans — 3% DV per serving

1 ounce: 0.4 mg (3% DV)
100 grams: 1.4 mg (9% DV)

10. Cashew Nuts — 2% DV per serving

1 ounce: 0.3 mg (2% DV)
100 grams: 0.9 mg (6% DV)

10 Fruits High in Vitamin E

While fruits are generally not a best sources of vitamin E, many yield good amounts. Fruits are also abounding in vitamin C, that cooperates with vitamin E as an antioxidant (2, 3).

1. Mamey Sapote — 39% DV per serving

Half a fruit: 5.9 mg (39% DV)
100 grams: 2.1 mg (14% DV)

2. Avocado — 14% DV per serving

Half a fruit: 2.1 mg (14% DV)
100 grams: 2.1 mg (14% DV)

3. Mango — 10% DV per serving

Half a fruit: 1.5 mg (10% DV)
100 grams: 0.9 mg (6% DV)

4. Kiwifruit — 7% DV per serving

1 middle fruit: 1.0 mg (7% DV)
100 grams: 1.5 mg (10% DV)

5. Blackberries — 6% DV per serving

Half a cup: 0.8 mg (6% DV)
100 grams: 1.2 mg (8% DV)

6. Black Currants — 4% DV per serving

Half a cup: 0.6 mg (4% DV)
100 grams: 1.0 mg (7% DV)

7. Cranberries (dried) — 4% DV per serving

1 ounce: 0.6 mg (4% DV)
100 grams: 2.1 mg (14% DV)

8. Olives (pickled) — 3% DV per serving

5 pieces: 0.5 mg (3% DV)
100 grams: 3.8 mg (25% DV)

9. Apricots — 2% DV per serving

1 middle fruit: 0.3 mg (2% DV)
100 grams: 0.9 mg (6% DV)

10. Raspberries — 1% DV per serving

10 pieces: 0.2 mg (1% DV)
100 grams: 0.9 mg (6% DV)

10 Vegetables High in Vitamin E

Like fruits, many vegetables are decent sources of vitamin E, though do not yield scarcely as many as nuts and seeds.

1. Red Sweet Pepper (raw) — 13% DV per serving

1 middle pepper: 1.9 mg (13% DV)
100 grams: 1.6 mg (11% DV)

2. Turnip Greens (raw) — 10% DV per serving

1 cup: 1.6 mg (10% DV)
100 grams: 2.9 mg (19% DV)

3. Beet Greens (cooked) — 9% DV per serving

Half a cup: 1.3 mg (9% DV)
100 grams: 1.8 mg (12% DV)

4. Butternut Squash (cooked) — 9% DV per serving

Half a cup: 1.3 mg (9% DV)
100 grams: 1.3 mg (9% DV)

5. Broccoli (cooked) — 8% DV per serving

Half a cup: 1.1 mg (8% DV)
100 grams: 1.5 mg (10% DV)

6. Mustard Greens (cooked) — 8% DV per serving

Half a cup: 1.3 mg (8% DV)
100 grams: 1.8 mg (12% DV)

7. Asparagus (cooked) — 6% DV per serving

4 spears: 0.9 mg (6% DV)
100 grams: 1.5 mg (10% DV)

8. Swiss Chard (raw) — 6% DV per serving

1 leaf: 0.9 mg (6% DV)
100 grams: 1.9 mg (13% DV)

9. Collards (raw) — 5% DV per serving

1 cup: 0.8 mg (5% DV)
100 grams: 2.3 mg (15% DV)

10. Spinach (raw) — 4% DV per serving

1 cup: 0.6 mg (4% DV)
100 grams: 2.0 mg (14% DV)

10 Cooking Oils High in Vitamin E

The richest sources of vitamin E are cooking oils, generally wheat virus oil. Just one tablespoon of wheat virus oil might yield around 135% of a DV.

1. Wheat Germ Oil — 135% DV per serving

1 tablespoon: 20 mg (135% DV)
100 grams: 149 mg (996% DV)

2. Hazelnut Oil — 43% DV per serving

1 tablespoon: 6.4 mg (43% DV)
100 grams: 47 mg (315% DV)

3. Sunflower Oil — 37% DV per serving

1 tablespoon: 5.6 mg (37% DV)
100 grams: 41 mg (274% DV)

4. Almond Oil — 36% DV per serving

1 tablespoon: 5.3 mg (36% DV)
100 grams: 39 mg (261% DV)

5. Cottonseed Oil — 32% DV per serving

1 tablespoon: 4.8 mg (32% DV)
100 grams: 35 mg (235% DV)

6. Safflower Oil — 31% DV per serving

1 tablespoon: 4.6 mg (31% DV)
100 grams: 34 mg (227% DV)

7. Rice Bran Oil — 29% DV per serving

1 tablespoon: 4.4 mg (29% DV)
100 grams: 32 mg (215% DV)

8. Grapeseed Oil — 26% DV per serving

1 tablespoon: 3.9 mg (26% DV)
100 grams: 29 mg (192% DV)

9. Canola Oil — 16% DV per serving

1 tablespoon: 2.4 mg (16% DV)
100 grams: 18 mg (116% DV)

10. Palm Oil — 14% DV per serving

1 tablespoon: 2.2 mg (14% DV)
100 grams: 16 mg (106% DV)

How Can You Get Enough Vitamin E?

Vitamin E is found in scarcely all dishes to some extent. For this reason, many people are not during risk of deficiency.

Yet, disorders that impact a fullness of fat, such as cystic fibrosis or liver disease, might lead to scarcity over time, generally if your diet is low in vitamin E (4).

Increasing your vitamin E intake is easy, even but supplements. For instance, an glorious plan would be to supplement some sunflower seeds or almonds to your diet.

You can also boost a fullness of vitamin E from low-fat dishes by eating them with fat. Adding a tablespoon of oil to your salad could make a poignant difference.

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